Chef Ryan

Cajun Chef Ryan

Feeling & sharing a world of cooking ~ more than your average Cajun



 



Corned Beef

January 6th, 2011 · 10 Comments

Corned Beef Sliced
Corned Beef Sliced

In this technique I will demonstrate preparing your typical corned beef, with several options and variations. For example, corned beef and cabbage is a very popular dish around the end of year holidays and for Saint Patrick’s’ Day as well. And then there is the New England Boiled Dinner, which includes the corned beef and cabbage along with potatoes, onions, and carrots. Other ways of preparing corned beef include baking in the oven, or grilling on the barbecue pit, or microwave, I am not going to demonstrate these techniques however, and you will never find me using a microwave to prepare a dish such as this one.

Corned beef and cabbage
Corned beef and cabbage

The most popular way of cooking corned beef is with the boiling method, simply adding the corned beef, the juice, and if there is a spice packet, adding it to a large enough pot and covering all this with  about an inch or so of water.  Bring to a boil, then reduce heat to a simmer, cover and allow to cook for about 2 ½ to 3 hours, or until fork tender, or an internal temperature of 160° F is reached.

If you are going to make the corn beef into the traditional New England Boiled dinner, then during the last 45 minutes of cooking you would add the potatoes, carrots, and onions, and bring back to a simmer. If you wanted to add cabbage, add it at the last 20 to 30 minutes of cooking. That simple!

New England Boiled dinner
New England Boiled dinner with Horseradish sauce, and some cabbage.

When you are ready to serve, allow the corned beef to rest for about 20 minutes, and then slice it across the grain into thin pieces. It also makes for a great Reuben sandwich, and I love making them with leftover corned beef.

Corned beef also tastes great with a horseradish sauce, so I have also included a quick to fix version of that sauce as well.

The Step-By-Step

Step 1. Place the corned beef with the fat side up, the juices, spice packet, and bay leaves into a large pot. Cover with enough water to just over 1 inch or so over the corned beef. Bring to a boil, then reduce heat to a simmer and cover. Allow to simmer for about 2 ½ to 3 hours or until fork tender and internal temperature of at least 160° F is reached.

Corned beef boiling
Corned beef boiling

Step 2. For a New England Boiled Dinner, with about 45 minutes remaining for the corned beef add the onions, potatoes, and carrots. Bring back to a boil and simmer until corned beef is cooked.

Add the onions, potatoes, and carrots
Add the onions, potatoes, and carrots

Step 3. For cabbage, add the quartered cabbage with about 20 to 30 minutes remaining cooking time for the beef. Bring back to a boil, cover, and simmer until beef is cooked.

Add the quartered cabbage
Add the quartered cabbage

Step 4. Remove corned beef from the boil, and allow to rest for 20 minutes.

Step 5. For the sauce, combine the mayonnaise, horseradish, and mustard in a small bowl and mix well.

Mustard, Blue Plate mayonnaise, and prepared horseradish
Mustard, Blue Plate mayonnaise, and prepared horseradish.
Horseradish Sauce
Horseradish Sauce

What you will need…

Ingredients
1 5 Lb. Corned beef
1 Packet Spices
2 Quarts Water
3 Each Bay leaves
1 Large Onion, chopped
2 Lb. Potatoes, cubed
3 Large Carrots, chopped
1 Head Cabbage, quartered
     
For the sauce
½ Cup Mayonnaise
1 Tbsp Prepared horseradish
2 Tsp Coarse mustard
 
Procedure Steps:
1. Place the corned beef with the fat side up, the juices, spice packet, and bay leaves into a large pot. Cover with enough water to just over 1 inch or so over the corned beef. Bring to a boil, then reduce heat to a simmer and cover. Allow to simmer for about 2 ½ to 3 hours or until fork tender and internal temperature of at least 160° F is reached.
2. For a New England Boiled Dinner, with about 45 minutes remaining for the corned beef add the onions, potatoes, and carrots. Bring back to a boil and simmer until corned beef is cooked.
3. For cabbage, add the quartered cabbage with about 20 to 30 minutes remaining cooking time for the beef. Bring back to a boil, cover, and simmer until beef is cooked.
4. Remove corned beef from the boil, and allow to rest for 20 minutes.
5. For the sauce, combine the mayonnaise, horseradish, and mustard in a small bowl and mix well.

To Serve: Slice into thin pieces and across the grain for tender texture.

Yield: Approximately 10 servings.

 

Bon appetite!
CCR
=:~)
©2011 CCR

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Tags: Entrees · Recipes

10 responses so far ↓

  • 1 claudia lamascolo/aka pegasuslegendNo Gravatar // Jan 6, 2011 at 4:56 pm

    We love Ruebens! So thats what this would become if there were any leftovers love them!

  • 2 Gera@SweetsFoodsBlogNo Gravatar // Jan 6, 2011 at 8:07 pm

    I adore corned beef but always purchased, here is common beef bbqed instead, but when I can, I’d try it very detailed-delicious steps, thanks Ryan!

    All the best,

    Gera

  • 3 penny aka jeroxieNo Gravatar // Jan 6, 2011 at 9:04 pm

    you know what? I miss corn beef and bummer that I had none in winter…

  • 4 DrickNo Gravatar // Jan 7, 2011 at 8:49 am

    love a good Reuben and unlike most folks, would rather have a Cajun sauce, similar to yours on it than Thousand Island… nice New England dinner

  • 5 LorenNo Gravatar // Jan 7, 2011 at 10:43 am

    I haven’t had corned beef in ages. This looks great. Do you corn your own? If so I’d love to read about your technique. I remember my dad used to do this when we were growing up and one of the lower fridge drawers would be taken over by a bag of brine and beef.

    Sounds like this is inspiring me to gear up for a new project. :?)

  • 6 Boudreaux RyanNo Gravatar // Jan 7, 2011 at 10:59 am

    Loren,

    I have not “corned” my own beef; however, it is not that hard to do. All you need is some kosher salt, saltpeter, some others spices, water, and a lot of time. It will take several days to a week or more to get the typical brisket “corned”.

    In fact, you can “corn” any cut of beef, I have seen a whole “Steamship” round of beef that was corned once, I am sure it took the better part of a month to get it brined correctly. A Steamship round is typically over 50 pounds and is the hind leg of the beef animal.

    Bon appetite!

    Ryan
    CCR
    =:~)

  • 7 Emily @CleanlinessNo Gravatar // Jan 7, 2011 at 1:18 pm

    This looks divine. Especially with the “horsey” sauce.

    Yum!

  • 8 NorahNo Gravatar // Jan 7, 2011 at 1:53 pm

    Aaahhh!! This looks so good!

  • 9 FrankNo Gravatar // Jan 9, 2011 at 6:57 pm

    Nothing better than corned beef and cabbage for a chilly January evening! A real crowd-pleaser and so very easy to make. Yum!

  • 10 TamarNo Gravatar // Jan 23, 2011 at 1:43 am

    Cabbage is so boring to me so when I have a craving for corned beef, I serve it with a side of kimchi instead.